IARC Releases Results: Coffee No Longer Classified as a Carcinogen

The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), an agency of the World Health Organization, today released their latest study on coffee and cancer, and coffee is no longer classified as a carcinogen.

Coffee was last reviewed by IARC in 1991, at which time they classified coffee as 2B – meaning “possibly” causes cancer. IARC’s new classification of coffee is now a 3 – which means that coffee cannot be classified as a carcinogen.

“Coffee is Canada’s most popular beverage – even ahead of water – so this is great news for coffee drinkers!” said Lesya Balych-Cooper, Interim President for the Coffee Association of Canada (CAC). “In fact, numerous studies, including this new IARC review, suggest that coffee consumption may be associated with a reduced risk of developing many cancers, including liver cancer and endometrial cancer.”

“We believe that this is the first time that a substance has improved its classification by IARC, which is likely because of the great body of evidence showing the benefits of coffee consumption,” said Balych-Cooper. “So Canadians can feel free to enjoy their coffee even more so now.”

A recent Harvard led study of 200,000 people over a 30-year period concluded that drinking one to five cups of coffee per day was associated with fewer incidences of death from cardiovascular disease, neurological diseases and suicide.

Coffee is also one of the most significant sources of antioxidants in the Canadian diet. Antioxidants are associated with a host of health benefits including risk reduction for ailments such as liver and colon disease(s), type ll Diabetes, Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease.

The potential benefits of coffee consumption are far-reaching.