Heart Health

Numerous research studies have examined the connection between coffee consumption and the heart. Several large-scale observational studies have found that a moderate coffee intake may not only be safe, but also possibly beneficial to one’s health. And the new 2019 Canada Food Guide lists unsweetened coffee as a healthy drink choice.

In June 2018, a study from a team of scientists in Germany revealed that caffeine from 4 cups of coffee can actually protect the heart. The study shows that caffeine promotes the movement of a regulatory protein into mitochondria, enhancing their function and protecting cardiovascular cells from damage.

massive umbrella study from 2017, collating data from 218 different meta-studies, concluded that coffee drinkers were 19 percent less likely to die from cardiovascular disease

A landmark Harvard University team study published in the New England Journal of Medicine followed 45,000 men and looked at various cardiovascular risk factors. It concluded that coffee consumption does not cause an increased risk of CHD. Similar conclusions have been shown with women as well. The Nurses Health Study, which with 85,000 subjects is the largest study ever conducted on women, also concluded that there is no evidence that coffee drinkers have a greater risk of developing CHD.

2016 report led by Dr. Gregory Marcus, a cardiologist at the University of California San Francisco, concluded that drinking coffee, tea or chocolate does not appear to cause heart palpitations, heart fluttering and other out-of-sync heartbeat patterns.

And a 2015 report by the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC), a not-for-profit organisation devoted to the study and disclosure of science related to coffee and health, concludes that, based on current research, moderate coffee consumption at approximately 3–5 cups per day may have a protective effect against cardiovascular disease mortality risk.


The CAC is committed to providing accurate, scientifically validated information from reputable sources. This website is intended to relay the findings of independent research studies, and is not intended to make health claims or provide medical advice. If you have specific questions pertaining to your health, consult a medical professional.